An Italian photographer has spent two years traveling the world capturing pictures of people with albinism, in a bid to highlight the discrimination that still exists against them in many parts of the world.

Silvia Alessi, 44, from Bergamo, took photos of people with the disorder, which is caused by pigment being completely or partially missing from skin and hair, for her latest art project after being inspired by an Instagram post. 

Among her subjects are three elderly siblings from , who have never been photographed together before, and a Kurdish boy with white hair and very pale skin who lives in a house decorated completely in white. 

Scroll down for the video 

A young Kurdish boy named Arya, who is seen posing amongst the pristine white décor of his family’s home, features in Skin Project by Italian photographer Silvia Alessi, who spent two years taking pictures of people with albinism

Stigma: the photographer says there’s still prejudice around the world against people who are born with the condition, which is caused by pigment being completely or partially missing from skin and hair (Pictured Kurdish boy Arya posing in his family home)

The project was inspired by a young girl named Namira who Alessi spotted on Instagram before she traveled to Mumbai and photographed her in person

The piece of art, entitled Skin Project saw Alessi contacting people who had shared their stories on what it’s like to live with albinism on social media before she traveled to take their photographs, others she simply met while en route.  

Albinism is a genetic disorder characterized by the complete or partial absence of melanin in the skin, hair, and eyes. It is thought to affect around one in 20,000 births.

As well as having a sensitivity to light, those with albino skin are also susceptible to sunburn and skin cancers.

Alessi says many of the people she met told her they still face exclusion from their communities over the way they look, with many young people she met with the condition fearing they wouldn’t meet someone they could fall in love with. 

Thought to affect around one in 20,000 births, albinism is a genetic disorder characterized by the absence of melanin in the skin, hair, and eyes, leaving those who have it with white hair and very pale skin (Pictured: Three elderly Indian siblings who have the condition)

The two sisters, Mena and Meena, and their brother Ramesh have never been photographed together before, says Alessi

Alessi traveled to New Delhi and Mumbai in India, and Sulaymaniyah in Iraq, to capture her subjects including an Indian lady pictured in traditional dress

Up close: Alessi asked her subjects to close their eyes to be photographed so they would completely relax…and says the project highlights the stigma that still exists around albinism

Two brothers, who both have the disorder but present in different ways, lie side by side 

The idea of the project is to highlight underlying social issues around the world’, says the Italian photo-artist

Many of her subjects were found on social media, while others she simply met on her travels

She said: ‘The idea of the project is to highlight underlying social issues around the world. For example, albino girls are often too afraid to marry for fear of people making fun of them.’

In one image, Namira, 18, who inspired Alessi to photograph Albino people, is captured as she studies her reflection in a mirror. Alessi spotted the teenager on Instagram and traveled to meet her.   

Alessi, 44, from Bergamo in Italy, spent two years traveling the world trying to capture the beauty of albinism

Many of those she met can’t go out until after dark because the sun would leave their skin vulnerable to burning and potential skin cancers

In Asia, albinism is still considered a taboo subject with many women fearing they won’t find a life partner because of the way their skin looks

Indian sisters Mena and Meena were both born with the condition, along with their brother Ramesh

Albinism is a genetic disorder characterized by the complete or partial absence of melanin in the skin, hair, and eyes. It is thought to affect around one in 20,000 births. 

As well as having a sensitivity to light, those with albino skin are also susceptible to sunburn and skin cancers. 

‘Namira was stood on a suburban train in Mumbai and I fell in love with her. Mumbai is a city of twenty million inhabitants but with the help of some friends, I was able to find her family home.

‘Like many other albino people, Namira can’t see in daylight so she only leaves her house after sunset. 

‘I noticed many of my subjects relaxed when I photographed them with their eyes closed.’

In search of others with the condition, Alessi traveled to New Delhi and Mumbai in India, and Sulaymaniyah in Iraq.

Another photo shows a striking image of a young Kurdish boy named Arya, who is seen posing amongst the pristine white décor of his family’s home.

She also met three siblings in the twilight of their lives who posed together for the first time.    

Alessi explained: ‘I particularly loved meeting Mena, Ramesh, and Meena – three elderly albino siblings. It was their very first time being photographed together.’ 

Share or comment on this article:

Photographer captures the beauty of albino skin in people across the globe

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Add your comment

 Post comment to your Facebook Timeline What’s This?

By posting your comment you agree to our house rules.

Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?

Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.

Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?

Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual

We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.

You can choose on each post whether you would like it to be posted to Facebook. Your details from Facebook will be used to provide you with tailored content, marketing, and ads in line with our Privacy Policy.

This content was originally published here.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

error: Content is protected !!